The benefits of social media and an online presence.

Posts tagged ‘Event Planning’

Choosing A Venue

Having an event but you aren’t sure where to hold it? Gather your friends and brainstorm ideas!

Write down venues in different areas and of different sizes. Don’t limit yourself based on funds either. Dream big and put the grand places down too because they might inspire ideas for a better event.

The Avalon Theatre in Easton, MD.

The Avalon Theatre in Easton, MD.

 

Whatever you do, be sure to consider the three basics.

Location: Hold your event in a town that is located in the middle of the demographic or people you are trying to reach. No one wants to drive too far, so be careful not to be drawn into the “perfect” venue. If it is outside of the area and you know attendees may not be willing to drive there, then it is not the perfect venue.

Capacity: How many people would you ideally like to attend? Do you have space for them? Or would you like to limit your party to fewer people and choose a smaller more intimate atmosphere? Would your event be more appropriate indoors or outdoors and will the weather cooperate? All of these questions need to be asked and answers will vary based on the type of event.

Popularity: If you’re able to promote your event successfully on your own, then have at it! Choose any place you’d like. But if you think you could use a little help with promotion, choose a popular well-established venue. It will be able to help you advertise your event to regular attendees and the venue can include  your event in its own promotional efforts.

As always, have fun! And good luck!

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Promotional Dos & Don’ts

Every event you’ve ever attended, you have heard about from some place or another like the radio, the newspaper, or maybe even a flyer. And what’s it called when an event planner let’s everyone know about an event?

That’s right, kiddos. Promotion!

Whether your event is large or small, I’m here to offer the basic dos and don’t to handling its promotion.

Advertising:
Do– Stay consistent. Don’t let potential attendees miss out because they didn’t hear about it. Find multiples advertising mediums and avenues including social networks, community calendars, and radio promos to let the public know.
Don’tSpam. If you post about your event on your Facebook page three times a day, people will become so sick of hearing about it that they may resent your spam and then not attend. Remind your potential attendees when the event is approaching but never annoy them.

Invites:
Do– Send an invite or promotional flyer to a specific group of your target demographic.

Don’t– Be vague or bland. Salutations such as ‘Dear supporter’, ‘Dear business owner’, and ‘To whom it may concern’ are not appropriate when sending invites. Think about how special you would feel if you received a basic invitation not addressed to you. Do they event want you there?

Press Releases:
Do– Take advantage of them! Even if only one or two local newspapers or news programs share a story on your event, that’s promotion. Why would you turn down free promotion?? So take the time to write a story that sounds interesting to you with a catchy title. It takes less work to edit a story than write one from scratch so it’s more likely that it’ll get published.
Don’t– Pull media. Put the bare minimum of general details in your press releases if you must, but if details are still being decided upon, do not include them. You can add information to your promotional efforts but you should never take away information. You never know who has already seen your posters.

As usual, good luck!

How To Politely Decline An Invitation

Event planning isn’t merely planning; it’s scheduling and properly managing your time.

So in the midst of your big event, you have four other events that you are expected to attend and they aren’t even yours! Coming from someone who never says no, I’m here to tell you that it’s okay to say no.

Knowing how to say politely say no. Here are some tips:

Make Time: Don’t say you are too busy for any of the events you’ve been invited to. Are you really too busy for your cousin’s wedding? Because being the amazing scheduler that you are, you probably aren’t. Prioritize which parties or events are most important to you. Consider the networking that will take place at that conference, or remembering that baby shower ten years from now.

RSVP Is Not Included Just For Fun: Once you’ve decided which invited you are declining, let that person know! When someone asks you to RSVP it’s because they’re trying to determine a count of how many will attend the event. This helps them determine the amount of food, drinks, or even chairs they will need. Be kind. 

Practice Good Public Relations: Don’t be too professional or informal with your friends, but practice good PR. Even if you feel bad about not being able to make it, don’t imply that you are still on the fence about attending. Your friend will appreciate a clear no and move on.

  • Always thank them for thinking of you.
  • Always apologize for not being able to attend.
  • Always follow your decline with “But I really appreciate the invite.” or some variation.

Finally, Call: Do not decline an invite via text or social media. It’s impersonal and the tone and quality of your voice when declining in person or on the phone will soften the blow.

Remember you can’t say yes to everyone. And one day I’ll learn to take my own advice.

Hope this helps!

Benefits of Having An Event Website

Let’s say you already have all the promotion you could need with flyers, press releases and social media posts. Okay, but have you considered creating a webpage for your event? If it’s a small-scale gathering, a Facebook event page would do. But if you’re planning well in advance and expecting several hundreds of people, build your own site!

Benefits of Your Event Website

  • All the information about your event can be found in one place! Attendees or potential attendees will be able to search your event name in Google to find your site and will immediately have access to all the information they could need.
  • Information can be organized on different pages and separated by tabs on the top for easy searching. For example there can be a separate page and link for ticket information, parking, event information, about us, contact us and more.
  • You have more to offer sponsors of your event by way of advertisement with links and logos posted to your website.

Tips

  • Use a free website creator such as weebly.com or wix.com. They have basic beginners templates and are easy to use. Personally, I really like weebly because you can easily create new pages and only have to drag and drop text boxes and photos to format your layout.
  • Buy your domain name. If you want to be able to advertise the website and make it look official. Purchase a name that will fit your event like Dew Tour’s www.dewtouroc.com. Simple right?
  • Include a contact form for questions. This will filter to your email address and allow you to answer any questions attendees have that weren’t answered on the website. If you’re lucky, you might only have to link them pages of your site to find the information. If not, edit your site to include the information they requested.

A website is an easy way to brand yourself. It also takes some of the pressure off of you when promoting your event because you’ll have a place to direct potential attendees for all their event needs.

Good luck!

How To Organize A Video Game Tournament

COD online kills me. Literally.

Despite my failure at first person shooter games, Call of Duty has taken the world by storm. The release of Call of Duty: Ghosts on Tuesday presented sales exceeding $1 billion on the first day. Having attended several midnight release tournaments in the past, I can guarantee a lot of these sales spawned from tournaments that took place to generate buzz for the release.

To organize a large-scale tournament, you would need a way to register participants and monitor the games played, a venue to set up several screens and consoles, and advertising. So, in an effort to make this less complicated, let’s just plan one for you and your friends.

FIRST: Rent a projector or find the biggest screen you have and hook your system up to it. It’ll make for a much better gaming experience. If you plan on having several friends play, you may want to try to set up two different areas to play so that the tournament moves faster.

NEXT: Have a bracket like in the playoffs of any sport. As each round is played, fill in the name of each winner until there is only one man left standing. Or ya know, woman.

FINALLY: Give a prize to the tournament champion! If this was a professional tournament, everyone would have to pay a registration fee and you could use that to reimburse you for the prize. But in this case, I would say give something small like a Game Stop gift card. And of course, bragging rights!

The moral of the event-planning story is an event can be planned around any current event or cool trend. The release of Call of Duty: Ghosts is no different.

Plan your own tournament and let me know how it goes!

Tutorial: How To Create A Facebook Event Page

Watch my screencast tutorial below to learn the basics of creating a Facebook event page!

Ready For A Beer Exchange?

Want to have a get together with your friends but tired of the same old parties?

How about a beer exchange?

Angry Orchard

Click for photo credit.

Here are the rules:

Choose A Location: Your house? Your best friends house? Despite the name of the party, try not to have your beer exchange at anything other than one of your friends’ houses.

Invites: Send out cool funny beer themed invites or just let your friends know via social media. Either way, make sure you only choose friends over 21 and include the time, place, and rules.

Rules: Speaking of rules, here they are! Each person brings a case of their favorite beer (24 in a case). Something interesting or exotic, but nothing you would see at a common frat party.

The idea is that you give each person, 12 attendees, 2 bottles from your case. Try to get everyone to explain why they chose the beer (or cider in my case) that they did and where they first tried it. At the end of the exchange, you go home with a case full of tons of different and interesting beers for the price of the original case.

Just remember that the number of attendees is up to you! Maybe you and your friends are just hanging out and want to have a mini beer exchange. Go for it! Grab six friends and six six-packs.

And maybe you’ve read all of this and the final reaction is still: Beer? Gross. That’s fine too! Just switch the beer for something else. Like your favorite wine or desserts.

Good luck!

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